Starry Trails

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Starry Trails


September 2020 Sky
A local star gazing enthusiast from Canton puts together an easy to use monthly guide to explore the sky from your own back yard. This is a perfect activity during this time when we are doing all our science from home. She publishes a star narrative, along with descriptive illustrations and pictures, and a visual guide map, and an audio guide. Examples of the instructions and illustrations are below.

She also has a simple star map.

                                                      




As we head through late summer into early autumn, our two largest planets are easy to spot in the southern sky, after sunset. Jupiter is brilliant and will certainly catch your eye. Saturn is to the left of Jupiter, not as bright (Illustration 1).




Mars continues to brighten, rising two hours after sunset on September 1st and one hour after on September 30th (Illustration 2). By month-end, Mars will be slightly brighter than Jupiter. Also, we celebrate the first day of autumn on September 22.




At this time of year, it is great to head outside and spend a few minutes enjoying the late summer sounds! We can still enjoy some warm nights, but autumn is just around the corner. Are you ready to enjoy our starry hike? Grab your Starry Trail map, bug spray, binoculars, jacket and chair or blanket.

Our hike begins around 8:30pm. To start, we will face west or the spectacular colors of the sunset. Look left and you will see brilliant Jupiter. Head slightly left and you will notice a golden colored object, Saturn. What a lovely sight in a telescope! Just to the right of Jupiter and Saturn you will notice the constellation Sagittarius, which looks more like a teapot. Journey right where the red, orange star Antares, the heart of Scorpius, can be found (Illustration 3). Between Scorpio and Sagittarius is the best part of the sky to scan with your binoculars and telescope! It is rich with deep sky wonders!




Turn right or back to direction west. Trek up and you will see a bright yellow, orange star, Arcturus. Arcturus has been with us since spring. Just above Arcturus, you will see a semi-circle of stars. It looks almost like a necklace, but it is the Northern Crown or Corona Borealis. I think it looks like a smiley face! Right overhead will be a keystone shape in the stars. This is the body of Hercules, the bravest and strongest hero (Illustration 4)! Binocular time! Take your binoculars and scan around the part of Hercules facing Corona. Do you see the fuzzy object? This is the finest Globular Star Cluster (M13) in the northern skies!

   
  
  
  
Starry Trails


September 2020 Sky
A local star gazing enthusiast from Canton puts together an easy to use monthly guide to explore the sky from your own back yard. This is a perfect activity during this time when we are doing all our science from home. She publishes a star narrative, along with descriptive illustrations and pictures, and a visual guide map, and an audio guide. Examples of the instructions and illustrations are below.

She also has a simple star map.

                                                      




As we head through late summer into early autumn, our two largest planets are easy to spot in the southern sky, after sunset. Jupiter is brilliant and will certainly catch your eye. Saturn is to the left of Jupiter, not as bright (Illustration 1).




Mars continues to brighten, rising two hours after sunset on September 1st and one hour after on September 30th (Illustration 2). By month-end, Mars will be slightly brighter than Jupiter. Also, we celebrate the first day of autumn on September 22.




At this time of year, it is great to head outside and spend a few minutes enjoying the late summer sounds! We can still enjoy some warm nights, but autumn is just around the corner. Are you ready to enjoy our starry hike? Grab your Starry Trail map, bug spray, binoculars, jacket and chair or blanket.

Our hike begins around 8:30pm. To start, we will face west or the spectacular colors of the sunset. Look left and you will see brilliant Jupiter. Head slightly left and you will notice a golden colored object, Saturn. What a lovely sight in a telescope! Just to the right of Jupiter and Saturn you will notice the constellation Sagittarius, which looks more like a teapot. Journey right where the red, orange star Antares, the heart of Scorpius, can be found (Illustration 3). Between Scorpio and Sagittarius is the best part of the sky to scan with your binoculars and telescope! It is rich with deep sky wonders!




Turn right or back to direction west. Trek up and you will see a bright yellow, orange star, Arcturus. Arcturus has been with us since spring. Just above Arcturus, you will see a semi-circle of stars. It looks almost like a necklace, but it is the Northern Crown or Corona Borealis. I think it looks like a smiley face! Right overhead will be a keystone shape in the stars. This is the body of Hercules, the bravest and strongest hero (Illustration 4)! Binocular time! Take your binoculars and scan around the part of Hercules facing Corona. Do you see the fuzzy object? This is the finest Globular Star Cluster (M13) in the northern skies!

   
  
  
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